Bone Densitometer at Mansfield CLSC

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Allyson Beauregard

MANSFIELD – After a three year fundraising campaign, the Centre de Sante et des Services sociaux du Pontiac, the Mansfield-et-Pontefract CLSC Foundation, and Pontiac MNA, Andre Fortin, unveiled the    new Bone Densitometer    currently in operation at the Mansfield CLSC, September 10.

Allyson Beauregard

MANSFIELD – After a three year fundraising campaign, the Centre de Sante et des Services sociaux du Pontiac, the Mansfield-et-Pontefract CLSC Foundation, and Pontiac MNA, Andre Fortin, unveiled the    new Bone Densitometer    currently in operation at the Mansfield CLSC, September 10.
“This machine will allow local patients to    be treated here, when      previously many had to drive to other areas. Congratulations to the community which raised 90% of the necessary funds,” said Fortin. “The CLSC mobilized the population and identified volunteers to get on board and to make the project happen. This is a good example of the Pontiac pulling together to get the services they need as quickly as        possible,” he continued.
Even though the price tag for the machine increased by $20,000 in December 2013, the Foundation was still   able to obtain it before the end of 2014. “The        population stepped up   to the challenge with       fishing derbies, golf  tournaments, donations after the loss of loved ones, and general donations; without them, this wouldn’t have been possible,” said Foundation member, Anne Amyotte. 
The Bone Densitom-eter, used to measure bone density in patients with Osteoporosis and bone cancer, among other conditions, is the first for the Pontiac. “Having the machine at the CLSC Mansfield will really help the location. We want to make sure    it remains open. The   building will be more essential if there are more people using more of its services,” added Amyotte, who reminds patients needing to use the machine to ask       their family doctors to         refer them to the Mansfield CLSC rather than elsewhere. 
Now that the machine has been purchased,     the Foundation plans     to move on to other        projects. “We haven’t chosen a specific project yet, but there are so many different needs in the Pontiac that I am sure we won’t have a problem finding one. We hope the population will continue to support our projects as they have in the past,” explained Amyotte.  
When asked whether the new machine would attract others to the region, Fortin explained the priority should be    to serve the Pontiac’s     population first. “If the Pontiac’s people are able to be adequately served before others are, that would be great. We are always happy to see people come to the area,    but we need to make   sure the services, wait times, etc. are maintained or improved for our        people,” he concluded.