Dangerous perspective about vaccines

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The false outrage and numerous scientific and medical errors in the letter “The Great Vaccine Inquisition?” in the March 27 edition of the Journal deserve a fulsome rebuttal.

The false outrage and numerous scientific and medical errors in the letter “The Great Vaccine Inquisition?” in the March 27 edition of the Journal deserve a fulsome rebuttal.
1) Outbreaks are increasing because a growing number of parents are not vaccinating their children. That this is happening, and being reported on, is not “promoting fear, hysteria and guilt about outbreaks”; it is simply a fact.
2) Opting out of vaccination isn’t an informed choice, it is a deliberate and wilful avoidance of the large body of scientific evidence demonstrating vaccines protect children and society from disease.
3) There is no fetal tissue or aborted baby parts used to make any modern vaccines – interesting this point is used in a letter arguing against fear-mongering.
4) The statement that “there is plenty of hearsay on both ends of the pro-vax or
anti-vax spectrum” is false. Vaccination proponents are using information and
evidence from decades of scientific study. The anti-vax movement is based on a
discredited scientific study in the UK and a bunch of internet conspiracy theorists
preying on the anxiety and fears of parents.
5) The statement “If we are all doing what we feel is right, and respect the choices of others, there’s no problem” isn’t true as some people cannot have vaccinations; example: people with some types of allergies and those with compromised immune systems. These people do not have a choice and are protected by herd immunity, which the anti-vaccination movement is undermining.
I could keep going, but to close, I think the Journal has done a disservice to public health in our community by printing an uninformed, and in my view dangerous,
perspective on this subject.

Kevin Brady
LUSKVILLE