Information and solutions lacking for Colounge River

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To make a clear distinction: the Coulonge River is about the size of the Gatineau River, not to be confused with Lac Coulonge, which is a wide and long expanse of water within the Ottawa River.

To make a clear distinction: the Coulonge River is about the size of the Gatineau River, not to be confused with Lac Coulonge, which is a wide and long expanse of water within the Ottawa River.
Many Mansfield and Fort-Coulonge residents were impacted this year by the Coulonge River’s flooding, including myself, but there was not one bit of public information easily available for this river during or prior to the flooding; predictions, current water levels—nothing. We were left on our own to determine what mitigation strategies to apply: Should we leave or keep pumping water
from basements? Are sewer systems going to be affected? Will electrical systems keep functioning? Etc. In this technological age, one would think this information would be at our fingertips.
Although there are no dams on the Coulonge River itself, there are industries operating dams on the river’s tributaries, which control tremendous amounts of water. Who is in control of these dams? Why isn’t public information readily available and distributed from them?
In my 50-some years living on this river, I have never seen water rise this high so fast. What is going on? Don’t tell me this winter was the worst we’ve ever had, because if so, you haven’t lived long enough to see winters that made this one look like a walk in the park. There’s a problem somewhere, and there doesn’t seem to be a solution. After 50 years of fighting this river and trying to adapt to its potential conditions, it never seems to be enough; the bar keeps getting higher with no end in sight.
Maybe it’s time to get out.

W. Laporte
MANSFIELD