The Journal interviews Will Amos – Liberal

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Allyson Beauregard

Will Amos believes keeping youth in the Pontiac is a matter of
supporting them with
their student loans and helping them start small businesses by offering grants, better financing, and cutting taxes. “The SADC needs further

Allyson Beauregard

Will Amos believes keeping youth in the Pontiac is a matter of
supporting them with
their student loans and helping them start small businesses by offering grants, better financing, and cutting taxes. “The SADC needs further
support. The Liberals plan to cut taxes for low and medium income Canadians by 1.5%. In order to pay for that, we will raise the taxes of the few who make over $200,000 per year by 3-4%… a progressive shift in taxation,” said Amos.
Amos says local businesses are one way to boost the economy. “The MP needs to bring in more conferences and events
to the area. We have a beautiful facility in Fort-Coulonge.”  He said investments are also needed in seniors’ housing. “This can be a major economic driver because real estate is
inexpensive here, and we offer health services… we have a great hospital in Shawville.” The candidate said more seniors housing will keep aging Pontiac residents in the area, adding to jobs and commerce.
As for the closed Marchand bridge, Amos said he will work with the Pontiac MNA to find
a solution since the bridge is a provincial respon-
sibility. “There are federal funds available for
heritage,” he added, saying tourism is not the only answer to the Pontiac’s future. “There will be
multiple answers out
there. There’s no one
sector that will be the solution,” he said, indicating his support for clean
energy job creation.
“We will see more incentives for the installation of solar parks, geo
thermal, retrofits for
low-income houses to
be efficient. Energy
efficiency and clean energy create jobs, in installation alone.”
Job creation needs
private industry investment, which can be
stimulated by the public sector. “Investments have to come from the Ottawa Valley. We need to see
ourselves as a regional economy and build on
our strengths to attract
investment. We have cheaper land, and beautiful land on the water. You have to work with the Chambers of Commerce, with private investors, and bring people over here and make that happen,” Amos told the Journal.
Amos says his background as a lawyer with the CRTC is beneficial in improving internet and cell phone service in the area. “The economy of the next generation is an internet- and outdoors-based economy that takes advantage of our location in the Ottawa Valley, our proximity to airports and train stations.” he said. 
“But if we don’t have reliable cell phone and internet service, no small business is going to set up here,” he continued. “I know how to work with telecom companies and understand their constraints.” 
Amos wants coordination between jurisdictions – including First Nations – to better manage the Ottawa River and species at risk. “I have written a plan on behalf of the Liberal government to improve governance of the Ottawa River watershed.  A clean environment is part of Pontiac’s ‘brand’.”
The candidate believes more flexible Employment Insurance programs are needed for seasonal workers and
promotes the Liberal’s non-taxable, Canada Child Benefit increase for
children under 18.
Amos said he is a defender of the supply management system and believes the forestry industry needs to be restarted. 
Amos, who said he would be “pleased to
collaborate with members of other parties in a minority context”, supports Bill C-51 but says it needs to be reformed. “If elected, we will repeal the aspects of C-51 which clearly violate the Charter and will strike the right balance by fixing the flaws of C-51 that threaten our freedoms while ensuring our security forces have the tools to deal with terrorist threats,” he explained.
Highlighting the Liberal’s 32-point plan to reform Canada’s democracy, Amos said if the Liberals are elected, this will be the last using the first-past-the-post system. “Proportional representation is one option
but there are many
variations,” he concluded.