Politics of outrage

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Some people seemingly aren’t satisfied if they can’t vent at some happening in the community. What used to be simple differences of opinion become built up into name-calling outrage episodes. Living

Some people seemingly aren’t satisfied if they can’t vent at some happening in the community. What used to be simple differences of opinion become built up into name-calling outrage episodes. Living
in Canada, we have the privilege of voting governments in or out. It’s not a right we share with everyone in the world. So people who adamantly protest a certain project or timetable of their government, insisting it’s due to gross incompetence or malfeasance, are usually wrong, in fact or intention. A good way of balancing against this tendency to oversimplify and misinterpret is to attend council meetings or consult the minutes.
In most cases, your local council is acting in the best interest of the community, and which project gets done at what time is a complicated matter of coordinating manpower and material availability. So, “voting the whole lot out of office” may be satisfying in the short run, but if you attend meetings, you’ll see that your fellow citizens who sit on council are just handling the business as it arises, within the confines of provincial regulations, time constraints and financial responsibilities.
So vote for outrage and disruption if you want, but don’t expect everything to automatically be fixed in two weeks’ time.

Robert Wills
SHAWVILLE/ THORNE