A proposed charter of Quebec Values?

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This certainly does not reflect the shared values of mine and many other acquaintances in this province. How then could this be a charter representing Quebecers?

This certainly does not reflect the shared values of mine and many other acquaintances in this province. How then could this be a charter representing Quebecers?
The statement was repetitively made that when people work for the state they will not be allowed to wear certain sized religious symbols. However I operate under the reality that it is the State that works for the people. Do people of faith not pay taxes too?
What is in a cross or a burka that has terrified the PQ government so badly? Does the mere presence of these items impede the ability of the employee from completing their work with excellence? Perhaps the PQ government should focus on things like Facebook, YouTube, and inappropriate cell phone use in the work place where people should remain productive and accountable.
Our forefathers gave of their lives to build a better, safer, inclusive nation, where people of all colours, tongues and creeds could build a life and dare to dream of a future. There are few among us who do not have a historical member of their family who has paid for the freedom we have, either through blood, or loss of innocence.
How will this law be enforced? Will there be individuals walking around with rulers to measure the size of our jewellery? Or will this be left up to the opinions of employers as to what constitutes big and bigger? Will religious symbols be banned from clothing where company logos, jokes and sexual references are allowed on t-shirts, caps and birthday cards? Where will this idea of so-called neutrality lead us and do we really want to go there?
Anyone who thinks that a person can remain completely neutral all the time is mistaken, including the State; people have mindsets, opinions and values that differ. This is the human condition. These cannot be separated from society; it’s what gives us individuality and distinction. We are required to have basic values and opinions to be able to, for example, vote and render judgment in cases.
I, for one, will not give up my freedom. Let your voice be heard: Charlotte L’Écuyer, MNA, 1-866-988-7070; Mathieu Ravignat, MP, 819-648-2003.

Jean-Claude Rivest
LITCHFIELD