Re: Expanding ATV network

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In response to the letter ‘ATVs will put the Pontiac on the map’ in the May 5th issue, we live on these ‘back roads’ and it only takes a few disrespectful ATV operators to spoil a great idea. Back roads that are currently open to ATVs are posted with signs showing the speed limit of 50 km\h. In areas with homes, courtesy signs are posted which clearly state 30 km\h.

In response to the letter ‘ATVs will put the Pontiac on the map’ in the May 5th issue, we live on these ‘back roads’ and it only takes a few disrespectful ATV operators to spoil a great idea. Back roads that are currently open to ATVs are posted with signs showing the speed limit of 50 km\h. In areas with homes, courtesy signs are posted which clearly state 30 km\h. To the bad apples, posted limits seem to be suggestions only.
The first warm Sunday this season, April 17, I opened all the house windows. Before noon, every window had to be closed. The noise was unbelievable and dust reached our back yard. Only a handful of riders respected speed signs.
Trail police and the SQ ask us to describe the bike, get the license plate number, and identify whether the offending driver is male or female. Would the females be wearing long flowing gowns?
At 2 am, it’s impossible to know if it’s a jet or a bike. In daylight, when an ATV or a dirt bike – which I am told are not allowed on the road – whistles past going almost warp speed, the dust creates billows the height of the hydro lines. A few of these bikes can be heard from a mile away. A pastime of a few of the yahoos is the
creation of donuts which leave ruts a couple of inches deep.
It is really quite nice to see bikers driving responsibly. On May 14, a convoy of at least thirty ATVs passed our house; they disturbed no one and they were a pleasure to watch. Get the others off the roads!

Joyce McCleary Binder
THORNE