Reinventing Canada’s future

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Hints of an election beg the question: will the election be between the two traditional stalwarts, Liberals and Conservatives, or will it realistically include the NDP and the Green Party?
Traditionalists may not see the need for “third” parties; to them, they merely muddy the election issues.

Hints of an election beg the question: will the election be between the two traditional stalwarts, Liberals and Conservatives, or will it realistically include the NDP and the Green Party?
Traditionalists may not see the need for “third” parties; to them, they merely muddy the election issues.
But look at a bit of history. Canada’s post-war boom brought prosperity to many. The economy was based on the materialism that burst from war-time shortages and rationing. As the economy boomed, Medicare blossomed, pensions were delivered and housing was plentiful. Food was transported from all over the world. Life for ordinary Canadians was getting better.
This wouldn’t last. The traditional parties eyed the growing wealth. Politicians were captivated by the wealthy, those who could lobby and who directed economic and fiscal measures. The rich wanted a bigger share. The ideologically fuzzy traditional parties offered what they sought.
This was the Reagan, Thatcher, Mulroney era. "Trickle-down economy" became the new watchword. Tax and fiscal measures lowered taxes for the wealthier, but boosted taxes and the burdens of economic growth on the middle class. These governments made few efforts to help those economically squeezed. Whereas post-war families needed one income for a good living, frequently it took two income-earners to keep up.
Today Canada needs an overhaul of its outlook. Why is it so difficult to institute a PharmaCare program to help people get their medications? Why is daycare so difficult to implement? Although CEO’s make $20,000 a day guiding media giants, we can’t afford high-speed internet in every corner of our great nation. Clearly, Canada needs the imagination, ideals and the vision of "third" parties.
The NDP and Greens reimagine a future built on a green economy, moving from
the dinosaur energy of tar sands’ fuels to sustainable and clean air, wind, and water energies. Social and economic justice must be companion elements in their platforms. This is how climate change challenges can be overcome.
The Trudeau government broke its promise to end “first past the post” elections because it saw the NDP and Greens benefitting from proportional voting. Isn’t it clear we need the NDP and the Green Party?
They offer new direction and hope, but they need our real support to help Canada build its future.

Carl Hager, PONTIAC