Sand Bay septic needs independent review!

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A permit to install an effluent discharge pipe for a bionest septic system crossing the beach and emptying into the Ottawa River was issued to the owner of a waterview property in Sand Bay. Installation took place on September 23, 2019 without any consultation with residents and no resolution from council approving the installation of this pipe crossing public land.

A permit to install an effluent discharge pipe for a bionest septic system crossing the beach and emptying into the Ottawa River was issued to the owner of a waterview property in Sand Bay. Installation took place on September 23, 2019 without any consultation with residents and no resolution from council approving the installation of this pipe crossing public land.
Yet, in the past, when a farmer wanted to install a drainage pipe under a public
roadway, a resolution approved by council was needed. The beach was previously a roadway and remains listed on the map as Camden Road. It’s advertised on the tourist map as a public beach and a group of Sand Bay volunteers have maintained it since 1940. 
Concerned citizens have been working diligently with a lawyer hired through
donations to ensure the health and safety of residents who’ve enjoyed this public beach for many years and wish to continue to do so for years to come. Several Access to Information requests were sent to the Municipality of Clarendon, resulting in either sections of the request ignored or pertinent information withheld.
A meeting with council, respecting COVID regulations, was denied and a meeting with the new building inspector to discuss soap suds spewing from the septic discharge pipe was also denied. Of great concern is the colour of the sand where the old cedar crib septic system and retaining wall are buried on the beach. The building inspector claims the soap suds are a normal shoreline action caused by windy conditions.
A previous Clarendon By-Law, No. 136 from 1974, was overlooked: even then you couldn’t let any effluent of any description enter Sand Bay water! Water flow wasn’t tested to ensure it met the specifications of a Bionest septic system; adequate water
flow to wash contaminants away is an Environment Québec requirement.
Crossing a public beach and impacting residents should have been considered
prior to issuing the permit and a public consultation could have prevented this
from becoming the problem it is now. Our goal is to have council provide permission to have another engineering firm provide a second opinion/review of the safety of the septic system. 
This is an election year and new people are encouraged to put their name forward for council positions. 

Joan Belsher
CLARENDON