Socio-economic impact of Bill 10

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The MRC Pontiac was settled in the 1800’s for the exploitation of the forests and the development of agriculture. It remains mostly Anglophone with a Francophone population of 45%; it is the poorest MRC in Quebec. The area

The MRC Pontiac was settled in the 1800’s for the exploitation of the forests and the development of agriculture. It remains mostly Anglophone with a Francophone population of 45%; it is the poorest MRC in Quebec. The area
suffered a disastrous decline in the forestry industry recently with the closure of four mills. Agriculture has continued to develop, but into fewer and larger dairy and beef farms.
The children of these loggers and farmers have gravitated to the service sectors of our economy, namely the hospital, CLSC, and long-term care establishments in our region. There are over 500 people employed full-time at the CSSS du Pontiac. As in many Western economies, the service sector has grown as the agricultural, forestry and industrial sectors have become more mechanized. The service sector currently represents 76.5% of the Canadian economy.
The largest service sector in the Pontiac is health care; its current budget is in excess of $36 million. The development of comprehensive health care in the Pontiac has been due to strong, local, leadership from the administration of the CSSS du Pontiac, as well as close cooperation with the physicians in the area.
This leadership has resulted in it having the only hospital in the rural setting to provide obstetrical care in the Outaouais. We also offer emergency room care 24 hours per day, operating room services, chemotherapy for cancer patients, etc. The CSSSP has constantly received the highest level of satisfaction by its clientele. Financially, it has achieved the closest to balancing its budget. Despite these achievements, the government will fuse this establishment on April 1 with the CSSS de Gatineau to create the new CISSSO.
Québec spends 30% of its GDP on health care, the lowest of any province or territory. Ontario spends in excess of 42% (Globe and Mail). The recent commitment to making the dialysis project a priority by our MNA was a positive
gesture, but what is
happening concerning its implementation?
The elimination of the administrative sector and support staff of the hospital, the CLSC, and the Long-term Care establishments will result in job loss and the removal of local decision making. How will this benefit the community?
Hopefully, Minister Ms. Vallée and Mr. Fortin can provide answers to these troubling questions.
Dr. Thomas O’Neill &
Dr. Lucie Mutchmore
SHAWVILLE