War is over (if we demand it)

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No matter what party is in power, when they decide how to spend money, the opposition will surely contest it as a frivolous waste, when something else is obviously more important. With a federal election a possibility, now is a time for citizens to set their priorities.

No matter what party is in power, when they decide how to spend money, the opposition will surely contest it as a frivolous waste, when something else is obviously more important. With a federal election a possibility, now is a time for citizens to set their priorities. There are the obvious needs for strategies to avoid a pandemic explosion, and a need for citizens and businesses to be aided in their recovery from the unprecedented health restrictions. This, and various forms of pollution that result from the world’s materialistic lifestyle, are the wars of this age. The old wars, between uniformed soldiers of one nation against another, are outmoded. The undeclared, but dirty and destructive war in Vietnam bore witness to the fact that war had changed. Nations should have heeded that clarion call.
There is no rationale for spending tankers of money on preparation for such a war
as in the 20th Century.
And yet, nations, including Canada, continue to waste money on war machinery that will never be used. The most likely war we will see in the near future is a civil war in the U.S., with inevitable spillover into Canada.
The wars of the future are not between nations, but between those who want
government to help its citizens, and those who want government to assure they
can continue to get richer on the backs of low-wage workers. If you want to get filthy rich, there’s no better way than to produce and promote war machinery that we all hope will never be used. In the next election, I intend to query candidates on their stance with regard to non-productive military spending. 

Robert Wills
THORNE/ SHAWVILLE