We can breathe now…

0
75

After 18 months of Parti Quebecois rule, Quebec experienced a shift in leadership after the recent         elections. The PQ finished with just 30 seats and 25.4% of the popular vote, a 7% drop from the 2012 elections. The Liberals won a majority with 70 seats and 41.5% of the popular vote, an increase of 10% from 2012.

After 18 months of Parti Quebecois rule, Quebec experienced a shift in leadership after the recent         elections. The PQ finished with just 30 seats and 25.4% of the popular vote, a 7% drop from the 2012 elections. The Liberals won a majority with 70 seats and 41.5% of the popular vote, an increase of 10% from 2012.
In just a few weeks, the PQ went from the front-   runner to winning distant second in what was their worst turnout in more than 40 years. Pauline Marois even lost in her own riding in the Charlevoix-Côte-de-Beaupré area, after which she resigned.
Not surprising, the Liberals won in the Pontiac with 75.75% of the votes, the CAQ with 8.94%, the PQ with 8,56%, Quebec Solidaire with 6.37%, and the Marxist-Lenist party with 0.39% of the votes.
While many are overwhelmingly pleased with the result, remember that both the Liberals and the PQ have failed miserably at improving the Pontiac’s situation; a clear indication that Pontiacers are truly stuck between a rock and a hard place when casting their votes.
Marois called the election convinced she was an       election away from a majority government. How could she not expect such a humiliating turnout with her horrible campaigning strategy?
The Liberals were less  visible in the media during the campaigning process, but it was a very intelligent move – all they had to do was stand back and watch their opponent dig her own hole. Smart isn’t it?
So where did it all go sour for the PQ from 2012 to now? The election results are a clear indication that      campaigns matter.
Perhaps the problem was that Marois failed to address the public’s concerns and instead focused on her own passionate desires. According to IPSOS, a reputable polling firm, the top four issues for voters were creating a better economy and jobs (41%), health care (36%), ensuring debt repayment and balancing the budget (24%) and lowering taxes (23%). I guess a referendum, and the    zenophobic charter of values didn’t make the cut – but she spoke about them incess-antly.
Leaders are elected by the public. So why ignore their concerns and replace them with your own?
Or perhaps it was the separation issue – a topic Quebec’s people decided against twice in the past. Marois said if she were to repeat her campaign, she wouldn’t  mention a referendum. Shouldn’t our government be transparent with their future plans? Isn’t that what the public wants?
Then again, maybe it was her attempt to deny basic human rights with her proposed charter of values that would limit public servants from wearing religious symbols and terminating the jobs of those who didn’t cooperate. Did she lose her own job over that same charter? 
But in the end, the public can thank Marois – she      provided all aspiring party leaders with a very detailed framework highlighting how NOT to run their election campaigns! 
Allyson Beauregard, Editor