We can do better!

0
88

In our last issue, we covered several events that occurred over the weekend of February 6-8. The Journal’s pages included several pictures of children and families participating in an array of events and activities; contrary to the

In our last issue, we covered several events that occurred over the weekend of February 6-8. The Journal’s pages included several pictures of children and families participating in an array of events and activities; contrary to the
popular complaint that “there is never anything to do in the Pontiac,” families had no excuse for staying home – especially on Saturday.
Pine Lodge in Bristol held a carnival where families could enjoy outdoor activities such as sliding, skating, snowshoeing, sleigh rides and more; in the evening they could enjoy
the outdoor lights display or
participate in a moonlight ski.
Billy T’s restaurant celebrated their 25th anniversary in Shawville with a sliding party that included games, snacks and more.
The Otter Lake Fire Department hosted their annual fishing tournament where they offered music, snacks, and prizes for the biggest catch, alongside various other activities. Another fishing derby took place in Campbell’s Bay.
A Valentines vendor show at the Shawville Lions Hall provided guests with a one-stop shopping destination with various vendors and their wares.
A country-themed Valentines Tea, that featured goodies, a cake auction, music, raffles, and an afternoon of visiting, took place at the Shawville United Church Hall.
Les Industries Jovalco in Litchfield hosted another
snowmobile race this year. Parents could either participate in or watch the races while children enjoyed various activities such as sliding.
All of these events occurred on Saturday.
It was nice to see the Pontiac area in such a state of festivity – everyone had numerous opportunities to go outside and enjoy the fresh air while having some fun, for little to no cost.
However, the situation was also unfortunate. It is difficult to find inexpensive activities to keep families entertained in rural areas, even more so during the winter months. Here we had an
abundance of events that could have represented over a month’s worth of activities – had they been planned back-to-back, one
weekend after another -– to keep families entertained and active, taking place on the same day. 
It wasn’t only unfortunate for families. The event organizers, who invested considerable amounts of time, money, and effort into planning their events also suffered the consequences.
The events and activities essentially competed with one another for participation, although, without a doubt, this wasn’t the intention.
Wouldn’t everyone’s interests have been better served if the events had been held on different weekends? Wouldn’t they have been more successful and boasted better turnouts? Living in a rural area requires increased cooperation and coordination to ensure everyone gets their fair share of the pie.

Allyson Beauregard, Editor