We didn’t elect the governments we hate

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In his editorial, “Hating the government we elect,” Fred Ryan makes several interesting points, two of which deserve some comment.  First, he claims that we hate the governments we elect. The point here is that we did not elect the             governments we hate.  Consider the last federal election.

In his editorial, “Hating the government we elect,” Fred Ryan makes several interesting points, two of which deserve some comment.  First, he claims that we hate the governments we elect. The point here is that we did not elect the             governments we hate.  Consider the last federal election. The Conservative party took only 40% of the total votes cast but gained a majority in the house.  Combine this with the way Harper has stacked the senate, and it is not possible to maintain the fiction that we have a representative government. Although “hate” is a strong word, the majority of Canadians can    easily find themselves in disagreement with a government that they did not elect.
The second point is his reminder that every vote counts.  However, in a       multi-party, first-past-the-post system, some votes count for more than others. This is especially so when the government has gained an absolute majority in        parliament when chosen by less than 40% of the electorate in one of the two houses of parliament.
If there is to be less hate of the government, perhaps replacing the first-past-the-post system with one that gives a more balanced representation of the   electorate will reduce this hatred and more truly make every vote count.

Peter Gauthier
SHAWVILLE